10 Ways to get the best out of your Hypnotherapy Session


1. Do some research

Choose carefully. Phone a shortlist of hypnotherapists in your area and ask a few questions such as:

• How does hypnosis work?

• Have they worked with people like you?

• How many sessions do they envisage?

• What training have they had?

• Do they offer support between sessions?

If their answers are open and you feel comfortable about how they sound, this can be a good first step.

2. Ask about the cost!

Calling to establish prices may give you an idea of price but not of quality: better qualified hypnotherapists may charge more but may save you in the long run by being more effective more quickly.

With the exception of one session smoking cessation, your hypnotherapy may take a number of sessions, so take this into account.

3. Play your part

Any therapy is a partnership. The hypnotherapist brings their skills, you bring knowledge of you. Be honest and open with your therapist. If you don't feel that you trust them, go back to step 1. and find another therapist.

4. Talk about the trance state

A hypnotic trance is not like you see it in stage hypnosis – that's entertainment – clinical hypnosis is therapeutic. People may experience trance differently: some feel heavy, some light, some drift off into a sleep-like state, some can hear every word that's said.

Your therapist will have lots of techniques to help you access trance and can vary what s/he does to suit you. Talk to your therapist in advance about what it might be like and let them know afterwards how you experienced it.

5. Tell us how you feel!

Hypnosis is likely to involve you closing your eyes, sitting in a room with a hypnotist who you've only just met. Not the most naturally relaxed of situations!

If you don't feel comfortable, physically, or with your therapist, say so, “I'm not feeling very comfortable”. Sometimes we feel a sense of politeness and believe that the therapist must be right, but a good therapist would much prefer to hear any doubts or queries. Then s/he can put your mind at rest. When you are relaxed with your hypnotherapist, you're more likely to get the outcome that you want from the therapy.

6. Know that change can happen quickly and sometimes it takes a bit longer

Hypnosis can feel magical. Sometimes people make big changes that feel natural and easy, like stopping smoking after a single hypnotherapy session. But not everyone! If your issue has been with you for many years, it may take a number of sessions for you to create the new patterns of thinking and behaving that you want.

7. Be prepared for ‘homework'!

Your hypnotherapy session takes up a fraction of your day. Be ready to do your part in continuing your progress between sessions; your therapist may ask you to do ‘homework assignments'. These are negotiable! But it's good to begin to do some things differently. Then you'll more quickly re-establish feelings of control over your issue and you'll avoid becoming dependent on your therapist.

8. Follow up

You may want to choose a hypnotherapist who offers support between sessions via e-mail or phone. With any form of personal change, you may experience things that you want to talk about with your therapist before the next session is due. Do check whether they offer this before you choose them!

9. Focus on what you want

We tend to get more of what we focus on. So instead of focusing on the ‘problem' start thinking of what it'll be like when the problem has gone away completely. What will you be doing? How will you be thinking and feeling? Look for your successes and take small action steps towards what you want. It really will help you to get there.

10. Keep a journal so you can monitor your change

One of the curious features of change is that once it has occurred, we happily blank out the old state of mind. Keeping a journal or making notes after the sessions will help you to see how far you've come.

Spread the word!

Many people can benefit from hypnosis but are nervous of taking that first step. When you've achieved amazing results through hypnotherapy, please pass on the details of your hypnotherapist to family and friends. Spread the word!

The dictionary describes the word "Hypnotherapy" as - "an artificially induced state of relaxation and concentration in which deeper parts of the mind become more accessible.  Used to reduce pain to encourage free association etc."

Hypnosis is not the same as sleep, you are still awake and in full control.  It is a different state of consciousness, neither awake nor asleep, an altered state of mind.  In hypnosis the therapist talks to the sub-conscious mind  by guiding you into a deep state of relaxation which then allows you to receive new thoughts and information, negative thoughts can be replaced with positive ones.

What is Hypnosis?

The dictionary describes the word "Hypnotherapy" as - "an artificially induced state of relaxation and concentration in which deeper parts of the mind become more accessible.  Used to reduce pain to encourage free association etc."

Hypnosis is not the same as sleep, you are still awake and in full control.  It is a different state of consciousness, neither awake nor asleep, an altered state of mind.  In hypnosis the therapist talks to the sub-conscious mind  by guiding you into a deep state of relaxation which then allows you to receive new thoughts and information, negative thoughts can be replaced with positive ones.

What form might the treatment take?

Firstly to dis-spell any popular beliefs - no one can be made to do anything they do not want to do under hypnosis.

You will remain fully aware of your surroundings and situation and the important part of hypnotherapy is that YOU want to CHANGE.  The ability of patients to be hypnotised varies considerably and usually requires several sessions in order to achieve meaningful results.

What problems can be treated by Hypnotherapy?

The best answer to this question comes from a passage written by Dr Hilary Jones - Doctor from morning TV - in his book titled "Doctor, whats the alternative?"

Hypnotherapy can be applied to many psychological, emotional and physical disorders.  It is used to relive pain in surgery and dentistry and has proved to be of benefit in obstetrics.  It can shorten the delivery stage of labour and reduce the need for painkillers.  It can ease the suffering of the disabled and those facing terminal illness.  It has been shown to help people overcome addictions such as smoking and alcoholism and to help with bulimia.  Children are generally easy to hypnotise and can be helped with nocturnal enuresis (bedwetting) and chronic asthma, whilst teenagers can conquer stammering or blushing problems which can otherwise make their lives a misery.


Phobias of all kinds lend themselves well to hypnotherapy, and anyone suffering from panic attacks or obsessive compulsive behaviour, and stress related problems like insomnia may benefit.  Conditions exaggerated by tension, such as irritable bowel syndrome, psoriasis and eczema, and excessive sweating all respond well, even tinnitus and  clicky jaws can be treated by these techniques.